1. Volkswagen is recalling 6,300 vehicles after their supplier informed them the rear coil springs they provided weren’t ready for production.

    Um, whoops? If the coil spring breaks it will cause an unsettling noise (bad), a sagging backend (worse), and can even puncture a tire leading to a sudden blowout (holy smokes terrible). Owners of the 2018-2019 Atlas, 2015 Golf SportWagen, and 2019 Jetta should be on the lookout for a recall notice in the mail.

    VW Coil Spring Recall

    keep reading
  2. There’s an important deadline coming up for VW owners who previously paid for repairs to their timing chain system or damage to their engine from a timing chain failure, and want the automaker to pick up the tab.

    A recently approved timing chain settlement benefits thousands of owners by providing them with an extended “new vehicle limited warranty” for any future repairs, plus conditional reimbursements for any previous repairs.

    The extended warranty is applied automatically if you own or lease one of the affected vehicles and didn’t opt out of the class-action.

    Owners who want to be eligible for reimbursements must file a claim by January 25th, 2019. More information is available at TimingChainLitigation.com.

    How to Submit a Claim

    1. Use the VIN lookup tool to check your eligibility
    2. Gather the documents requested by the Claim Administrator
    3. Submit your claim before 11:59 PST on January 25th, 2019
    keep reading
  3. A defective quick connector might allow fuel supply lines to detatch from the engine of over 500 Golf R cars.

    Volkswagen is recalling the cars because when detached, the lines stop supplying fuel to the crankshaft (very important) and start depositing it onto hot engine surfaces (very dangerous).

    The same connectors are being recalled in the Audi A3 and TT. Maybe it’s time to go back to the drawing board on this quick connector design?

    keep reading
  4. The head restraint guide that keeps it attached to the seat frame may not have been properly welded in 169 VW vehicles.

    This is the second welding-related recall this year. They also recalled the Tiguan’s shock absorbers back in May. What in the weld is going on at these factories?

    About the Recall

    • Recalled are 2018 Volkswagen e-Golf, Golf R, Audi A3 Sedan and RS3 vehicles that need the rear seat frames replaced._
    • In the last couple months a petition was handed to safety regulators because of weld concerns in the Jeep Wrangler, Subaru had to recall the brand new Ascent for missing welds, and even Maserati’s sub-frames are breaking because of welding mistakes.
    keep reading
  5. You know that annoying-but-useful chime that comes on every time you open the car door with the key still in the ignition?

    Turns out it might not be working in the 2018-2019 Atlas and 2019 Jetta. VW determined a data container wasn't coded correctly, something that will cause a failure of the instrument cluster to provide an audible warning when the driver opens the door with the key still in the ignition.

    That’s a federal safety no-no. To fix the issue, VW has scheduled a recall for January 18, 2019.

    keep reading
  6. A tiny number of 2019 Jetta cars shipped with passenger-side LED headlights that are out of position.

    VW says a driver may have trouble seeing at night, not to mention the incorrect settings violate federal safety standards. Only 28 cars are being recalled so the chances are pretty low that yours is one of them.

    Of course it’s a much higher probability than you hitting that $1.6B mega millions jackpot, so look into it.

    keep reading
  7. When Volkswagen agreed to a multi-district settlement for selling polluting engines marketed as clean diesel, it did so knowing it’d have to pay billions of dollars to customers that owned or leased an affected vehicle when the news about the scandal broke.

    Some owners that had sold their affected vehicles before the news came out tried to file for compensation in court, but didn't get very far. That may be about to change due to an interesting court decision in California.

    Former owners and lessees of Volkswagen "clean diesel" vehicles can proceed with their lawsuit even though the customers got rid of their diesel vehicles before anyone knew the emissions systems were illegal.

    Volkswagen, as you might image, is less than impressed with this decision.

    Volkswagen says the case is nothing more than trial attorneys trying to suck more money out of the automaker that has already paid more than $25 billion for its emissions sins.

    keep reading
  8. Like many diesel vehicle owners, Allen and Jennifer Pickard chose to keep their two Passats as part of Volkswagen's $10-billion diesel emissions settlement.

    The agreement came with compensation contingent upon the exhaust system being modified to meet EPA standards. And sure, every owner knew that likely meant a knock to engine performance or fuel economy. But I doubt anyone expected this...

    According to court documents, both Passats have been in the custody of an authorized Volkswagen mechanic for months because the emissions repairs caused both cars to not start.

    The plaintiffs claim numerous attempts made by VW technicians have failed to fix the no-start problems, so the owners tried to trade in one of the Passats. The lawsuit alleges they were told a trade wasn't possible because the car was worth $0 since it couldn't be started.

    Needless to say the couple is … let’s call it, “unimpressed” with VW’s “fix” and has filed a lawsuit against the automaker.

    keep reading
  9. Owners and lessees of certain 2008-2014 VW and Audi vehicles may soon be eligible to receive benefits for their engine’s defective timing chain.

    On November 19, 2018 a judge will rule on a proposed settlement that would either reimburse owners for previous repairs or fund future work on the timing chain tensioner system.

    This decision has been a long time coming. Even snails are embarrassed by how slowly this case has crept along.

    keep reading
  10. A new lawsuit says VW is aware of a Touareg design issue that allows water to enter the engine, causing a sudden failure.

    The plaintiff says their engine failed for a second time while driving in traffic. Following an inspection, the dealership informed her that water had leaked into the air filter. She claims technicians accused her of intentionally driving through a lake of water in order to damage her Touareg.

    Dealerships sure can get creative with their unfounded accusations, eh?

    Volkswagen sent an engineer to inspect the SUV and it was confirmed water entered the air filter and engine because “drain in air guide was clogged with debris.”

    The real issue appears to be the air intake’s drain vales can get clogged, allowing water to saturate the air filters. When the engine draws air through the wet filter, it also pulls in water leading to stalling or a complete loss of power.

    The proposed class-action lawsuit includes all consumers in the U.S. who purchased or leased a VW Touareg manufactured between December 2014 and November 2017.

    keep reading

Having car trouble?

Tell Us What's Wrong With Your Vehicle

The best way to find out what's wrong with a vehicle is from the people who drive them. Not only do owner complaints help us rank vehicles by reliability, but they're often used to spark class-action lawsuits and warranty extensions. Plus, they're a great way to vent.

Add a complaint