All about Volkswagen complaints

A comprehensive resource of all things that can wrong in an Audi. And the occasional bright spot.

The More You Know

I'm guessing whoever said "what you don't know can't hurt you" never drove a Volkswagen.

The Worst of Volkswagen

We collect quite a bit of data around here, so let’s take a look at what’s changed in community, activity, hiring, meetups, and more over the past year …

Recent Volkswagen News

Leaking Brake Lines in the 2017 Passat

It’s been a bad week for 2017 Volkswagens. First there was a tiny recall for seized up engines in the 2017 Jetta. Now the 2017 Passat is being recalled to replace leaking brake lines.

Engineers traced the brake fluid leaks to end flares of the brake lines that were damaged during manufacturing, causing the seals to be faulty. A low brake fluid warning light will activate when the fluid reaches a certain level.

Details on this recall are still coming in.

Two 2017 Jettas Recalled for Seizing Engines

Whenever a recall is announced, there’s good reason to hold your breath. Especially when you hear Volkswagen is recalling the 2017 Jetta because its 1.4-liter engine can seize up. Well, breath easy friends – because this recall is for two vehicles. Yes, two.

Well breathe easy unless you’re one of the two unlucky ones. Then you should probably breathe fire.

Volkswagen is giving two choices to the two owners (or one owner if they own both Jettas): VW will replace the engine block in the vehicle or buy back the vehicle. However, Volkswagen didn’t say what will be paid for the new Jetta.

And while you’d think this would be the smallest recall in history, Kia says step aside, amateurs.

VW Releases 3.0L TDI Settlement Terms

Volkswagen has released a settlement update for 83,000 Audi, Porsche, and VW vehicles with TDI engines. And methinks most owners are going to be Scrooge McDuck levels of happy.

VW Touareg Diesel Owners Right About Now

Owners of the 2009-2012 VW Touareg 3.0L diesel have a decision to make. They can accept a buyback offer between $26,000 to $58,000 (depending on model year and mileage) or owners can keep their SUV, wait for VW’s fix, and receive up to $15,380 as compensation for their troubles.

Even previous owners will be eligible for payments ranging from $4,627 to $7,747.

For owners of certain 2013-2016 Touareg TDIs, once VW gets the go-ahead from environmental regulators, they will fix the vehicles without offering any buybacks. However, once repaired, owners and lessees will get compensation ranging from $8,539 to $17,614.

Current lessees will also be given the option to terminate their lease without any penalty.

All this is to say that VW is paying through the nose for cheating on their diesel emissions. In total, more than $1 billion will be going back to consumers. And that number could grow significantly if they can’t come up with an adequate fix.

There’s a breakdown of the details on CarComplaints.com.

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