Common Airbags And Seat Belts Problems

  1. Clock Spring Failure

    Volkswagen owners continue to have clock spring problems years after the parts were first recalled. The failed recall is under investigation, but in the meantime VW owners are staring at a disabled driver's side airbag, horn, and steering-w…

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  2. VW Vehicles with Recalled Takata Airbags

    A large number of VW vehicles have been recalled because they contain dangerous airbag inflators made by Takata. The shrapnel-hurling inflators have been recalled in over 37 million vehicles (and counting).

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Where Airbags And Seat Belts Complaints Happen

Sometimes it helps just to tally up the complaints and see where the biggest stacks are. Use this information to learn about troublespots or to run for the hills.

Recent Airbags And Seat Belts News

There's a lot of news out there, but not all of it matters. We try to boil down it to the most important bits about things that actually help you with your car problem. Interested in getting these stories in an email? Signup for free email alerts over at CarComplaints.com.

  1. Volkswagen and Audi are recalling 119,000 vehicles to replace dangerous Takata airbag inflators.

    This campaign is part of an industry-wide effort involving more than a dozen automakers and 1.7 million vehicles. The chemical inside of Takata airbag inflators can become unstable over time, leading to violent and sometimes deadly airbag deployments. The recall is for both driver and passenger side inflators in the 2015-2017 CC, 2015-2016 Eos, and 2015 Passat.

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  2. The 2018 Atlas has been recalled because a twisted A/C evaporator tube can drain water onto the floor of the SUV’s cabin.

    Not only are wet carpets stinky, but they can also damage fragile electrical components underneath. You know, like the mini computer that controls your airbags and whatnot.

    Volkswagen first checked into the problem in August 2017 after complaints about wet carpets, illuminated airbag warning lights and deactivated airbag control units. VW didn't see it as relevant to safety and issued a service campaign.

    10 months after sweeping the problem under the (soggy) rug, a control unit fizzled out and inadvertently deployed an airbag in a 2018 Atlas. Luckily no-one was hurt.

    It’s almost as if those WARNING lights were trying to tell VW something a year ago.

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  3. For the love of everything, is there an airbag out there that's not trying to kill us these days?

    We all know about Takata, the airbag supplier which made moisture-sensitive, death traps that are responsible for worldwide panic. Well, not to be outdone we're now looking at more airbag recalls but this time from a supplier named Autoliv. From CarComplaints.com:

    "About 5,900 vehicles are affected by front passenger and side head airbags that may not deploy during a crash. In addition, the seat belt pre-tensioners may not activate during a crash if you're driving a 2017 Audi Q7, A4, A4 allroad or 2018 Audi Q5."

    The saddest part? Airbags that don't deploy may actually be safer than those that do deploy these days.

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  4. Your vehicle might be involved in one of the largest and most dangerous recalls in automotive history.

    Volkswagen is recalling 850,000 VW and Audi vehicles with Takata inflators.

    You've probably heard about Takata by now. They're the ones that made airbag inflators which sometimes explode with too much force and send metal shrapnel flying throughout the cabin. They're also the ones that have been linked to a number of deaths and injuries. Needless to say, there aren't a lot of Takata fans out there.

    But wait, there's more ... replacement parts aren't expected to be available until later this year.

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  5. Your vehicle might be involved in one of the largest and most dangerous recalls in automotive history.

    Volkswagen is recalling 734 VW Tiguans and Audi Q5s with Takata airbag inflators.

    You've probably heard about Takata's defective inflators by now. They're the ones that explode with too much force and sometimes send metal shrapnel flying throughout the cabin. Yeah, those. They've also been linked to a number of deaths and injuries.

    While the majority of Takata airbag recalls have been for frontal airbags, this recall is for airbags mounted on the seats which deploy from the side.

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  6. **Th

    re are 11 automakers that have recalled millions of cars with Takata inflators. So far, VW isn't one of them. However, that might change soon because NHTSA documents say investigators want to know if an exploding side airbag in the 2015 Tiguan is related to previous Takata recalls.

    The vehicle in question experienced a ruptured side airbag in a June crash when the driver struck a deer. Unlike Takata airbags that have killed and injured vehicle occupants, the Missouri driver wasn't injured and it's possible this airbag explosion is different than previous Takata airbag ruptures._"

    In addition to the 2015 Tiguan, NHTSA will be determining which VW vehicles have airbags that contain ammonium nitrate.

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  7. Federal investigators are wondering if an issue in the steering column could stop the driver's side airbag from deploying in an accident for 30,000 VWs.

    That type of problem turns das aüto into a dangerwägon very quickly.

    At the heart of the investigation is the steering column control module which is connected to all the electronics in your steering wheel -- airbags, radio controls and horn. There's really no way for you to test your airbag short of running into a cement pole (which I very strongly recommend against). However, if you've noticed problems changing stations from your steering wheel or your horn sounds more and more like a sick duck, it could be a sign of a bigger problem.

    The investigation is focusing on 30,000 of the 2012 VW Passat and 2012 VW CC cars.

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